Forum

Login        Register

It is currently 2:18 on Friday 28 November 2014



Board Index » Archive » Sri Lanka 2012 (inc. World T20)


Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 2 [ 11 posts ] Go to page 1, 2 Next
Author Message
gideonellis
Post subject: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 11:11 on 2nd Sep 2012

Joined: 23:53 on 13th Nov 2011
Posts: 11
Hi - I'm going to be taking my folding bke to SL for the world cup but would appreciate any advise on how to get to Pallekelle. I've looked on google maps and its supposed to be less than 9 miles but cycling that distance in the dark and especially if it's hilly may be quite hard work. Cheers
Top
Reply with quote
blueandy1mac
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 09:10 on 3rd Sep 2012

Joined: 12:30 on 14th Jul 2008
Posts: 2172
Location: Preston UK
This was mooted before the tour earlier this year. I repeat what I said and everyone else was thinking.
Biking in SL ????? You need your bumps felt. At night? You should be sectioned, no offence.
Top
Reply with quote
Big Harvey
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 23:17 on 3rd Sep 2012

Joined: 09:14 on 23rd Apr 2008
Posts: 2374
gideonellis Wrote:
Hi - I'm going to be taking my folding bke to SL for the world cup but would appreciate any advise on how to get to Pallekelle. I've looked on google maps and its supposed to be less than 9 miles but cycling that distance in the dark and especially if it's hilly may be quite hard work. Cheers


Kandy is in The Hill Country, which ought to give you some idea of the kind of terrain to expect!

Personally, leaving aside my current health issues, I wouldn't even consider cycling in those parts during the day, let alone at night.

Driving in Sri Lanka is much like elsewhere on the subcontinent except with above average levels of aggression, and no shortage of crazy overtaking manouvres. Cyclists are very much at the bottom of the food chain, too. Sri Lankan drivers are more likely to give way to a pedestrian or a wandering animal than a cyclist.

To get to Pallekele, see if the owner of your guesthouse will drop you off and pick you up. Alternatively get a tuk-tuk (preferably arranging for the man to pick you up afterwards), or if cost is an issue, get the bus.

The area around the coast is pretty flat, and better for cycling, but expect some hair-raising experiences. In all honesty you would need to be a very keen and brave cyclist for bringing a bicycle to Sri Lanka to be worthwhile. If you do, make sure you've got good travel insurance.
Top
Reply with quote
mike
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 07:20 on 4th Sep 2012

Joined: 08:08 on 23rd Jul 2008
Posts: 53
Location: Southampton
gideonellis Wrote:
Hi - I'm going to be taking my folding bke to SL for the world cup but would appreciate any advise on how to get to Pallekelle. I've looked on google maps and its supposed to be less than 9 miles but cycling that distance in the dark and especially if it's hilly may be quite hard work. Cheers


Unless you have a penchant for SL hospital food, seriously, have another think about this
:shock:
Top
Reply with quote
Slightly Chilled
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 05:58 on 24th Sep 2012

Joined: 11:12 on 15th Sep 2012
Posts: 8
I live in Kandy and cycle out to Pallekella sometimes.
It's pretty true about the driving here and I would not drive here at night. But I would not stop riding here.The road going out is downhill to the Earl Regency.After that the road is quite nice and not as bad as what people imagine. However coming back after the Earl Regency is all uphill and rather unpleasant with lots of buses overtaking.
What you could do is to fold up your bike and take a tuk tuk back if you feel uneasy.
Regards
Michael
Top
Reply with quote
gideonellis
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 17:01 on 13th Oct 2012

Joined: 23:53 on 13th Nov 2011
Posts: 11
Bike made all the difference between a good holiday and a fantastic holiday. What I needed to know was that the bus 654 ran from Pallekelle to Kandy or alternatively a tuk tuk was 400 rupees.

Really glad I didn't listen to some of the comments. G
Top
Reply with quote
blueandy1mac
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 12:50 on 14th Oct 2012

Joined: 12:30 on 14th Jul 2008
Posts: 2172
Location: Preston UK
Strangely I tend to find that if I post on a website asking for advice /information, I get responses some of which I might not appreciate if its not what I wanted or expected to hear.
For the most part respondents on here like to give useful advice quite freely and with the best of intentions. If you do'nt want to listen to advice thats completely up to you, but at least be a little grateful that people took the time to try and offer it to you, with YOUR best interests at heart. I am very happy that you are back safe and sound, but I still feel you took an undue risk in a country with very limited medical facilities.
Top
Reply with quote
bread
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 18:29 on 14th Oct 2012

Joined: 12:04 on 18th Jun 2008
Posts: 194
Location: Mansfield
We got a lift back in an ambulance after the Sri Lanka game and for about 6 miles on the wrong side of the road, glad you didn't need our services then G
Top
Reply with quote
gideonellis
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 20:01 on 14th Oct 2012

Joined: 23:53 on 13th Nov 2011
Posts: 11
kkkk
Top
Reply with quote
gideonellis
Post subject: Re: Getting to Pallekelle
PostPosted: 20:16 on 14th Oct 2012

Joined: 23:53 on 13th Nov 2011
Posts: 11
I'm a bit lost about the last reply but certainly two of the earlier replies I received were helpful, a couple of the others I'm not so sure. I did think about writing earlier but felt I would leave it until I was back home.

I can write from experience now that the roads in Sri Lanka can potentially be very dangerous and none more so from tuk tuk and bus drivers who appear to resent having to share the roads with other users. What surprised me though is how this was any different to England or at least the part of London where I live and routinely get cut up when cycling.

When cycling in both Colombo and Kandy I noticed that there were other cyclists, not many but there were some. These other cyclists are more familiar with the road and riding conditions but were subject to the same dangers as I was. If they can live with those dangers then I don't see why I shouldn't try and do likewise.

In summary thanks to those who did provide useful advise and perhaps I can make a suggestion for all Barmy Army members to consider cycling when on tour.
Top
Reply with quote
Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 2 [ 11 posts ] Go to page 1, 2 Next